CF Classics Small Logo

A look at all of the football club suffixes (endings) in the English leagues...

  • Albion, West Bromwich, Brighton, Burton. It's apparently taken from an ancianet word for Britain.
  • Alexandra - Crewe. Named after the wife of King Edward VII, Princess Alexandra.
  • Argyle - Plymouth. Rumour has it that they were named after a pub in the city, the Argyle Tavern.
  • Athletic - Charlton, Oldham. The clubs originally started as athletic clubs, as well as football.
  • City - Manchester, Bristol. This is a reference to the area that the club represents.
  • County - Derby, Notts. This is a reference to the large area that the club represents.
  • Dons - Milton Keyne. A reference to the nickname of the club they tookover, Wimbledon, before controversially relocating to Milton Keynes.
  • Forest - Nottingham. A reference to one of the symbols of the city.
  • Hotspur - Tottenhma. Apparently named after a character from Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Harry Hotspur.
  • Orient - Leyton. It's thought to come from players who alos worked for the Orient Shipping Company.
  • North End - Preston. A reference to the area of the town where they originally played.
  • Rangers - Queen's Park Rangers. Another name that is believed to come from the fact that the club originally had no regular home pitch to play on, so had to travel around to play.
  • Rovers - Blackburn. Similar to Wanderers, it's thought to refer to the fact that the club were roving around playing matches, as they had no regular home pitch.
  • Stanley - Accrington. Named after another club in the Accrington area, Stanley Villa.
  • Town - Huddersfield. This is a reference to the area that the club represents.
  • United - Manchester, Newcastle, Sheffield. MAnchester United may be the most famous but it was actually Sheffield who first adopted the name, a sign of unity in a town or city.
  • Villa - Aston. It's thought to come from the name of a cricket team in the area at the time of the club's formation.
  • Wanderers - Bolton, Wolverhampton, Wycombe. It apparently refers to the fact that some clubs originally didn't have a fixed home ground, so would travel to different places to play.
  • Wednesday - Sheffield. One of the most unusual club names in football, it dates back to their origins as a cricket club and the day of the week that the players would meet up to play.