Greatest Belgian Footballers of all-time



No.18 Armand Swartenbroeks



No.17 Daniel Van Buyten



No.16 Francois Van der Elst



No.15 Jean-Marie Pfaff



No.14 Franky Van Der Elst



No.13 Thibaut Courtois



No.12 Franky Vercauteren



No.11 Michel Preud'homme



No.10 Erwin Vandenbergh



No.9 Romelu Lukaku



No.8 Wilfried Van Moer



No.7 Vincent Kompany



No.6 Eden Hazard



No.5 Eric Gerets

One of European football’s greatest right backs, Eric Gerets was a mainstay of the Belgian national team from the mid 1970s right through to the early 1990s, captaining the Red Devils at three World Cups and amassing 86 caps along the way, second only to Jan Ceulemans when he retired in 1992.

An attack-minded full-back, he had 12 great years with Standard Liège before single seasons with Milan and MVV Maastricht. In 1985 he was signed by PSV Eindhoven and enjoyed an incredible career swansong at the Eindhoven club, winning six Eredivisie titles in seven seasons and captaining them to European Cup glory in 1988.



No.4 Enzo Scifo

Enzo Scifo was a midfield playmaker who seemingly had a bit of everything to his attacking game. He was equally adept at playing in an advanced attacking midfield role, on the right, or further back as a deep-lying playmaker, dictating the tempo of his team's play. It goes without saying that his passing was one of his strongest assets, be it his short game, linking up play and stitching moves together, or his precision on his cross-field balls or deeper passes to start quick counter-attacking moves. Scifo was fantastic carrying the ball too, his dribbling and darting runs proving a constant menace for the opposition. And to top it all, Scifo knew where the back of the net was. He may not have scored as many free-kicks as others in this list, but he was deadly in open-play from around the edge of the box, his trademark goals were often low drilled shots arrowing low into the corner of the net.



No.3 Kevin De Bruyne

One of European football’s greatest right backs, Eric Gerets was a mainstay of the Belgian national team from the mid 1970s right through to the early 1990s, captaining the Red Devils at three World Cups and amassing 86 caps along the way, second only to Jan Ceulemans when he retired in 1992.

An attack-minded full-back, he had 12 great years with Standard Liège before single seasons with Milan and MVV Maastricht. In 1985 he was signed by PSV Eindhoven and enjoyed an incredible career swansong at the Eindhoven club, winning six Eredivisie titles in seven seasons and captaining them to European Cup glory in 1988.



No.2 Jan Ceulemans



No.1 Paul Van Himst

A legend not only of Anderlecht, but of Belgian football in general, Paul Van Himst was one of Europe's greatest forwards in the 1960s and 1970s.

His 16 years at Anderlecht would see him win eight Belgian league titles, and his ratio of a goal-every-other-game more than contributed to the success of Les Mauves et Blancs. Van Himst's footwork and dribbling skills would often result in opposition players resorting to fouls in an effort to stop him, and this would lead to his unusual nickname of Polle Gazon, which translates as Paul Lawn - a reference to the amount of times he would end up on the turf because of the fouls!

As well as outstanding technique, Van Himst could finish as well, and his combination of goals and assists enabled him to play as both a striker or in a playmaking role. He became the youngest ever recipient of the Golden Shoe (Belgian football's most prestigious award) when he won the award as a 17 year-old in 1960, and he'd go on to win it four times, which remains a record to this day.